Author Spotlight – Alien versus predators: effective induced defenses in an invasive frog

Alien versus predators: effective induced defenses of an invasive frog in response to native predators E. Pujol-Buxó, C. García-Guerrero and G. A. Llorente Have you ever asked yourself, as a biologist, when should a species be considered “invasive”? You may even have discussed it with your colleagues. And when is a species “allochtonous”? Seems easy to define... Continue Reading →

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Author Spotlight: How soil features are shaping the bite force and skull morphology in subterranean rodents

The role of soil features in shaping the bite force and related skull and mandible morphology in the subterranean rodents of genus Ctenomys (Hystricognathi: Ctenomyidae) L.R. Borges, R. Maestri, B.B. Kubiak, D. Galiano, R. Fornel and T.R.O. Freitas Tuco-tucos (genus Ctenomys) are subterranean rodents widespread in the southern cone of South America. They are members of the caviomorph lineage (e.g.... Continue Reading →

HIDDEN GEM: Contributions to a Knowledge of the Hemipterous Fauna of St. Helena, and Speculations on its Origin

The Zoological Society of London has been publishing scientific papers in zoology since 1830, and our backfiles contain a wealth of 'hidden gems' written by early explorers and zoologists. This article by F. Buchanan White, M.D., F.L.S., was published in 1878 in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, a predecessor of Journal of Zoology. It is a fascinating... Continue Reading →

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Journal of Zoology

The Zoological Society of London, founded by Sir Stamford Raffles in 1826, has published scientific papers in zoology since 1830, first as Proceedings and Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, and in 1966 these publications were merged to form the Journal of Zoology. We are delighted to celebrate the 50th anniversary of our journal by releasing a free Virtual Issue... Continue Reading →

Author Spotlight: The Need for New Categorizations of Dietary Specialism in Animals

Emilio Pagani-Núñez, Craig A. Barnett, Hao Gu & Eben Goodale Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, People’s Republic of China   Moreover, it is not understood when a species will evolve a particular niche width through the device of being polymorphic with phenotypes which are resource specialists, monomorphic with one generalist phenotype, or some intermediate... Continue Reading →

New Journal of Zoology Podcast

A new episode of the Journal of Zoology podcast is now available and you can listen to it here. In this episode, Tim Thurman and Brett Seymoure talk to us about their study on two mimetic butterflies and how similar they appear to the eyes of their predators, we will learn from Lucy Lush how biologging... Continue Reading →

Winner of the 2015 Journal of Zoology ‘Paper of the Year’ award

Journal of Zoology Blog

Biochemical correlates of aggressive behavior in the Siamese fighting fish

M. D. Regan, R. S. Dhillon, D. P. L. Toews, B. Speers-Roesch, M. A. Sackville, S. Pinto, J. S. Bystriansky and G. R. Scott

 

Aggressive interactions between individuals of the same species can result in the evolution of exaggerated body traits that improve success in these interactions, and subsequently, access to resources such as food and mates. Although conspicuous morphological adaptations such as antlers are usually what come to mind, metabolic processes that occur hidden within cells are required to sustain aggressive behaviour, so their enhancement may also be important for a successful outcome.

Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens; photo by Dave Toews

With this in mind, we designed a study to examine the intersection of aggressive behaviour and metabolic biochemistry using the Siamese fighting fish, a staple of the world’s pet shops. Male Siamese fighting fish are notoriously…

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